Fascinating Animals

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Archive for the category “Mammals”

Story Dogs help children read

Story Dog Puppy
the blog author with Sid a Brussels Griffon

I count myself very lucky, being someone whom respects all animals, and meeting the cutest special little pup ever this week!

Introducing Sidney Swain (or Sidney for short), a gorgeous soft cuddly beautiful amazing Brussels Griffon puppy. Sidney is the younger brother of the wonderful handsome, sweet and adorable Erik the Brave.

Read more…

Christmas Bilby

Photo from Ipswich Nature Centre 

A baby bilby boy has been born in time for Christmas at the Ipswich Nature Centre in Queens Park, Queensland.  The Bilby is a symbol of Hope in Australia.

The Bilby and its struggle for survival is symbolic of the plight of many of Australia’s small native animals. It has been suggested that Australia adopt the Bilby as the wildlife symbol of Easter in Australia.  Hence chocolate Bilbies are around at Easter time.  See this link here.

The World Wildlife Fund says:

The bilby is an important ecosystem engineer. It’s an excellent digger and so many other species reap the rewards of its hard work. When bilbies aren’t living in their complex burrows, which can be up to three metres long and two metres deep, other animals like insects, reptiles, birds and small mammals take up residence. The burrows provide vital shelter from predators and high summer temperatures.

Bilbies might be small but they punch well above their weight. They can shift more than 1.5 tonnes of soil per kilogram of body mass in a single year as they construct and maintain their subterranean homes.

https://www.wwf.org.au/what-we-do/species/bilby#gs.0NLKAHI

For more information and photos of this Bilby (who is yet to be named) please go to the Ipswich Nature Centre website.

Bilbies, or rabbit-bandicoots, are desert-dwelling marsupial omnivores; they are members of the order Peramelemorphia. At the time of European colonisation of Australia, there were two species.  Bilbies now occupy only about 15% of Australia’s landmass. There were originally two species but the Greater Bilby (Macrotis lagotis) is now commonly referred to simply as ‘the Bilby’ as the Lesser Bilby (Macrotis leucura) is thought to have become extinct in the early 1950s.

Class: Mammalia

Order: Peramelemorphia

Family: Thylacomyidae; Bensley, 1903

Genus: Macrotis

Species: lagotis

Did you know: Previously more widespread, the bilby is now only found in remote parts of western Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.   savethebilbyfund.com

Good information about Bilbies can be found at the webpage below.

https://www.bushheritage.org.au/species/bilby

For information about the Vulnerable status of this mammal, by the IUCN, click on the link below.

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/12650/21967189

Tiny Alpaca, Cody, has a big personality

Alpaca classification

Cody the Alpaca was born premature and for a while it was touch-and-go as to whether she would survive.  With the help of Amber Isaacs from Silken Suri, this little girl pulled through, and is a delight to all who know her.  Visit “Silken Suri” below and Cody’s Facebook page.

http://www.silkensuri.com/

https://www.facebook.com/codyalpaca


The story of Cody is based on the real life of one of the smallest surviving alpacas in the US. Now healthy and happy, Cody’s joyful antics have won hearts across the country and all over the world.

Alpacas are Camelids and are shorn and their fleece used in clothing.   Thousands of years ago they were used in South America for fuel, transport and clothing.  The largest population of alpaca is found in the Andean zone of Bolivia and Peru.  For information about this and about alpaca wool, please click on the first link below.

https://www.jjcaprices.com/blogs/news/15598296-alpaca-wool-what-makes-it-so-special

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Other Resources

How to keep Alpacas – difference between Llamas and Alpacas

http://www.stonebarn.co.nz/alpacahistory.php

 

Giraffes recommended to be placed on the U.S.A. Endangered Species List

Kamili baby giraffe

Kamili baby giraffe

Did you know that a series of valves in the Giraffe’s neck stops blood from rushing to its head when it bends down to drink?

Read more here  about the amazing Giraffe !

The Perth Zoo’s Australasian Giraffe Breeding program has resulted in a wonderful and cute new addition.  She is a Rothschild Giraffe, Kamili, which is Swahili for “perfection.”  Click on the following links for more information.

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/animals/perth-zoo-unveils-name-of-baby-giraffe-kamili-ng-b88790424z

https://perthzoo.wa.gov.au/article/we-have-giraffe-calf

Around this time last year, five major wildlife protection groups petitioned the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to list the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) as an endangered species.

An article in “The Conversation” states that – While extinction can be a natural process, the current rate of extinction is anything but. Scientists estimate that at least 99 out of 100 species extinctions in the world today are the result of human action.

It also states:

In 1964, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) began tracking the conservation status of species on its “Red List.” Although the IUCN provides information only about the status of species, this is the first step in helping to limit extinction because it allows conservation efforts to be directed where they’re most needed.

In 2016 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature–  IUCN – SSC Giraffe and Okapi Specialist Group (GOSG) recognized a single species of giraffe, Giraffa Camelopardalis as vulnerable.  This means the animal faces extinction in the wild in the medium-term future if nothing is done to minimize the threats to its life or habitat. The next steps are endangered, critically endangered, extinct in the wild and extinct.

AA GIRAFFE CLASSIFICATION

Read more…

Who Is the Strongest?

READ  MORE   HERE   !

The half inch long dung beetles are the strongest living creatures on Earth. The male insects of this small species of insects can lift or pull 1141 times their own body weight. It is just like an average sized human carrying 80 tons or 72574.8 kg.

The news might take the shine off the title of World’s Strongest Man for Lithuanian Zydrunas Savickas; in 2009 he pulled a 70-tonne plane for 30m in under 75 seconds – this works out as only 411 times his 170kg body weight.

What makes dung beetles so strong?

Written Mar 26, 2016  by John Cassis

Small creatures all seem strong relative to their size, because their strength is relative to the cross sectional *area* of their muscles, not their weight or volume. If you double the length of an organism, the muscle cross-section goes up four-fold, but the weight and volume go up 8 fold – so you get bigger-er not stronger-er.

Another way of looking at it is that if a dung beetle can lift it’s own weight, then if it were to double in size, it could only lift half of its weight, without developing proportionally bulkier muscles.

This topic was famously covered in a 1928 essay by JBS Haldane, called “On being the right size”. I think it’s one of the most lucid science essays I’ve ever read.

See also:

http://britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca/scalefactor/factors.html

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161121-the-worlds-strongest-animal-can-lift-staggering-weights

Well, today at work I was barely able to lift a heavy box (to me) of files, weighing 15 kg.  My weight is 43 kg only, and if I take the load ( 15 ) and divide it by my personal petite weight ( of 43 kg), the result is 0.35 – which is a very rough SWR !!

STRENGTH TO WEIGHT RATIO

The Link above does mention working out this ratio uses averages including “Bench presses”.  You may, like me, innocently ask “But what IS a Bench press ??”    It is laying on your back and picking up weights on a bar and raising them up and straight above, in my terms.  Looks dangerous to me!  Wikipedia says:

The bench press is an upper body strength training exercise that consists of pressing a weight upwards from a supine position. … A barbell is generally used to hold the weight, but a pair of dumbbells can also be used.

This page  HERE  mentions averaging out your ratios after different types of exercises, like squats and bench presses.  The closest I note that matches lifting a heavy (for me) box is the DEADLIFT –  read  HERE for info.

However, my “dead-weight Lift” involved a square shape and a dense solid mass, not a nice (looking) bar with weights at either end – this different structure makes a difference to your SWR.

The box I lifted was destined to go to an off-site storage company, that has a weight limit for each packed box (to be picked up and carried by their drivers) – – – and that Limit is 16 kg.  Not bad therefore that I could lift 15 kg, in my great opinion.

My 43 kg weight converts to 95 pounds.   I used   THIS  site to work out that (in theory) a 45 kg female could or should (if she wanted) lift a 26 kg dead-weight.   Speaking for myself, I had best do some intense “resistance” (strength) training, before I attempt picking up and lifting a BARBELL (bar to attach weights to)  with any weights on it at all !!

If you are keen to find out more about weight training equipment for human beings,  try  THIS  page.  It mentions the lightest weight plates (which affix to the barbell) are 2.5 pounds for Americans or 1.13 kg for Australians.  It seems an average barbell itself (without the weights at the end) weighs 20 kg.  It would be a great day when I  dead-lift 21 kg total (barbell + 0.5 kg weight at each end), let alone 26 kg -barbell plus a 3kg weight at each end.

That would mean a SWR of approximately 0.5 up alot from an SWR of 0.35 for my “dead-box” lift today (LOL).  I would be happy with being able to lift 50% of my body weight, even if the Weaver Ant can lift 10 to 50 times its body weight !!

See:

http://britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca/scalefactor/factors2.html

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161121-the-worlds-strongest-animal-can-lift-staggering-weights

Deer Man – Darius helps a female Fawn

Doe, a Deer, a female deer, this lovely Story could be made a happy song.  A Deer with two babies left the female behind because she had a bad leg.  This is the natural instinct of the mother, but luckily for the Fawn, a dear man was watching.

Darius took the Fawn into his home, and introduced the baby to his many other animal companions.  He fed the baby every 4 hours and put a brace on her leg.  After that he successfully introduced her back to her Family !!   Of course, the nay-sayers on You Tube have left their Dis-likes & their strange comments like one person has said ‘Some who Disliked the Huffington Post’s video of this story, don’t like a public display of the story.”

What would they rather?  Perhaps they are okay with Darius knocking on their door telling him this story or they are happy with it just being known and passed around locally?  How about the facts, that it was reported to the Huffington Post, he didn’t go looking for “fame” and the fact that this story HAS and will inspire others to carry out such kind acts.

If you go to Darius’ You Tube channel, you will find a follow up video about the dear family! Of course he has posted this in response to people asking how the Fawn has fared since he helped her and released her to her deer family.

https://www.youtube.com/user/honeysada

In my opinion the World could do with more people like Darius.

Thank you Darius !

U.S. Adopts Near-Total Ivory Ban

The regulations, which take effect on July 6, amount to a near-total ban on the commercial trade of African elephant ivory. Current law allows for the sale of ivory and ivory products in limited cases where the seller can prove the ivory is old and was lawfully imported. But the new rules further restrict exports and sales across state lines, as well as limiting ivory trophy imports to two per year, per hunter.

 

Read more   HERE

elephant thank you

Collective Hearts save abandoned Pup

Jakk puppy

A deformed puppy was abandoned in a Skip or a Dumpster in Western Australia recently, out the back of a “Hungry Jacks” restaurant.  Luckily for this little fellow, whom has been named Jakk, an employee heard his cries and took it upon herself to look in the bin, where she rescued this cute pup.

Jakk may have “swimmers syndrome” – one of his front legs is crooked and the other has a paw with only a few toes.  WA Pet Project took him on, and Jakk’s temporary carer Edith has said she has no hard feelings against whoever dumped him, who MAY be backyard breeders.  For a lovely photo of Jakk and more on this story, click on the Link below.

https://www.communitynews.com.au/news/Dumpster-puppy-Jakk-getting-shot-at-life-thanks-to-WA-Pet-Project/7685166

Read more…

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